Tudor swiss watch , diving watches, luxury watches

RANGER

In 2022, to mark the 70th anniversary of the British North Greenland Expedition, TUDOR is presenting the Ranger model, a tool watch celebrating the spirit of this daring adventure, complete with Manufacture Calibre MT5402, a 39-millimetre case and a clasp with rapid adjustment system.

THE SPIRIT OF A TOOL WATCH

The new Ranger continues, within the TUDOR collection, the tradition of the expedition watch, born with the Oyster Prince watches used by the members of the British North Greenland Expedition. The tradition of a robust, practical, and affordable instrument.

MANUFACTURE CALIBRE MT5402

The Ranger model is equipped with Manufacture Calibre MT5402. Its construction has been designed to ensure robustness, longevity, reliability and precision due to its variable-inertia balance, which is held in place by a sturdy traversing bridge with two points of fixation.
  • THE RANGER SAGA

    The history of the Ranger name dates back much further than the British North Greenland Expedition. Although the TUDOR watches used by its members from 1952 to 1954 never bore this inscription on their dials, subsequent Ranger models have perpetuated the concept of the expedition watch, a robust, practical, and affordable instrument, born at TUDOR during this time.

  • The origins

    The origins of the TUDOR Ranger family date back to 1929. This was the year when Hans Wilsdorf registered the “Ranger” name, just three years after registering the “The TUDOR” trademark.

    1929
  • TUDOR REF. 279

    In the years following the registration of Ranger, the name was not used to indicate a model specifically, but instead to add an adventurous touch to certain watches in the TUDOR collection, like with this reference 279 made for the Indian market.

    1943
  • OYSTER PRINCE REF. 7808

    The Oyster Prince watches used by the members of the British North Greenland Expedition from 1952 to 1954 never bore the Ranger mention on their dials. Subsequent Ranger models however have perpetuated the concept of the expedition watch, a robust, practical, and affordable instrument, born at TUDOR during this time.

    1952
  • OYSTER PRINCE RANGER REF. 7995

    The Ranger aesthetic standards, Arabic luminescent numerals at 3, 6, 9 and 12 on black dial and arrow hour hand, were established in the 1960's.

    1965
  • PRINCE OYSTERDATE RANGER REF. 9050

    Offered in a number of variations over the course of their history, Ranger models existed with or without date, initially with the TUDOR rose logo on their dials, later replaced with the TUDOR shield logo, from 1969 onwards.

    1969
  • PRINCE OYSTERDATE RANGER II REF. 9111

    As early as 1973, a version of the Ranger was made with an integrated bracelet under the name “Ranger II”.

    1973
  • HERITAGE RANGER REF. 95760

    Introduced in 2014, the Heritage Ranger was a 41 millimeter diameter self-winding watch featuring all the design elements characteristic of the Ranger aesthetics but the Ranger mention at 6 o'clock.

    2014
  • RANGER REF. 79950

    The latest Ranger model follows the aesthetic standards established in the course of the history of the model, whilst incorporating new state-of-the-art technical elements, including a high-performance Manufacture Calibre and a TUDOR “T-fit” clasp.

    2022
  • Celebrating the 70th anniversary of the British North Greenland Expedition

  • The British North Greenland Expedition represented a seminal moment for TUDOR and its tool watches. In fact, this was one of the very first long-term tests, under real-world extreme conditions, implemented by the brand.

  • The members of the expedition monitored variations in the precision of their Oyster Prince watches compared to the hourly signals emitted by the BBC, and recorded them in notebooks specifically provided for this purpose.

  • In light of the expected temperatures, the TUDOR watches sent for this project were specially lubricated with “arctic” oil and provided with bracelet extensions so the watches could be worn over the sleeves of the parkas.

  • Upon returning from Greenland, one of the members of the expedition wrote in a letter to TUDOR, which has been preserved in the brand’s archives, that his watch “maintained remarkable precision” and that “at no time did it need to be rewound by hand”.

State-of-the-art watchmaking technology and historic aesthetics